Monthly Archives: June 2018

Pendo’s promising future

On January 4th, 1999, proud mother Maria gave birth to a beautiful baby girl. She named her precious child Pendo, meaning “Beloved.” Pendo, an only child, was dearly loved by both her mother and her father, Thomas. The family lived together in a small home in the remote village of Songea, Tanzania. Tragically, the family would soon have to part ways.

When she was just a toddler, Pendo lost both of her parents to HIV/AIDS. Orphaned, she was sent to live with her grandmother to start a new life. Her grandmother, however, didn’t have the resources to properly care for Pendo on her own.

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More, please! Meals at our Madurai Site

India, bustling and beautiful, offers countless historical and cultural experiences. Colourful clothing, rich history, and new connections are just some of the amazing things you’ll discover as a visitor. One of the most important, captivating, and diverse things about India is it’s incredible cuisine.

Characterized by regional ingredients and rich flavours, Indian cuisine is a highlight to locals and visitors alike. Dishes vary regionally due to the availability of ingredients, customs, and preference.

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Join us on our 2018 Haiti Medical Mission Trip

Did you know about Chalice’s mission trips? It’s our joy to provide you with an opportunity to volunteer and experience life at our sponsor sites. Both you and those you meet will be enriched by a life changing exchange.

Our Haiti North Sponsor Site has invited Canadian Chalice volunteers and staff members to work alongside site staff and staff at parish-run medical clinics. The request is for a medical team to provide services and training in the areas of general medicine, vision, and public health education.

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From unable to unstoppable: Mykola’s miracle

 
Mykola, 17, is a sponsored child from our Ternopil site in Ukraine. Mykola was born with cerebral palsy, and requires ongoing clinical and therapeutic treatments. He is unable to care for himself and depends on his mother’s help full time, leaving her unable to work. His father is the sole provider for the family, but often struggles because he earns very little income. Mykola’s parents couldn’t afford to continue his costly therapy treatments on their own.

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